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Colombia

Bullfighting in Colombia began with the organization of bullfights to celebrate the independence from Spain. These bullfights were, however, organized by the Spaniards who conquered the region. Today, Colombia has various forms of bullfighting.

The majority of the Colombian population is against bullfighting. The mayor of Bogota, Gustavo Petro, decided to prohibit bullfighting in the Colombian capital.

Furthermore, there are festivities with bulls in Colombia. The most popular event is called La Corraleja, in which a bull is teased by a crowd. Corralejas are very informal and wild and the bull is challenged with various objects. Sometimes horses are used. Even though the bulls are not slain, they often get injured by falls and assaults.

Another feast in Colombia is known as El Coleo. This is a popular sport in which two riders try to get a bull on the ground by pulling on his tail or other body parts. The bulls are not slain during the event but frequently get injured.
© CAS International
Together with local organizations we set up campaigns in several Colombian places like Bogota and Medellín to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.

Help the bulls and horses in Colombia! Become a sponsor or make a donation.

Bullring la Santamaria in Bogota © CAS International




Ecuador

Historical documents demonstrate that bullfights already took place in Ecuador in 1576. It is assumed that bullfighting was taken up in this country in 1551. Today, Ecuador has various forms of bullfighting.

The majority of the Ecuadorian population is against bullfighting. In 2011 a referendum was held in which people could vote to ban the killing of the bull in the bullring. In most states it is now illegal to kill the bull during the bullfight. Since the referendum the annual numbers of bullfights in Ecuador has strongly declined, because many bullfighting lovers are not interested in bullfights without the delivery of the killing blow. In addition, children under 16 are prohibited to visit any bullfights.

Furthermore, patronal festivals with bulls take place in Ecuador as well. In the Riobamba region bullfighting is very popular and a lot of Toros de Pueblo festivals take place. As part of the event a red cloth is attached to the back of the bull (some say it is sewn into the skin), in which some money was placed. Amateur bullfighters try to get to this pouch. Usually, the bull is not slain during this event.
Ecuador bullring
Together with local organizations we set up campaigns to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.

Help the bulls and horses in Ecuador! Become a sponsor of make a donation!

© CAS International



France

Bullfighting in France only takes place in the south of the country. These are Spanish-style types of bullfighting and local varieties of bullfighting. During 'Spanish' bullfights in France more than 1,000 bulls are slain every year.

Although bullfighting is banned in France by law, it is allowed in the 11 departments in the south of France. According to the French law, bullfights are permitted in regions that have an uninterrupted tradition of bullfighting. In the rest of the country it is prohibited. In addition to tihs, the majority of the French people is against bullfighting.

Together with local organizations we set up campaigns in several French places such as in Mimizan to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.
Bullring DAX France
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Bullring in Dax © CAS International



Mexico

Historical documents inform us that in 1526 bullfights already took place in the region that is now Mexico City. Mexico is the most important bullfighting country of Latin America. Nevertheless, the majority of the Mexican population is against bullfighting. Despite this fact, various forms of bullfighting take place in Mexico.

Patronal festivals with bulls are also present in Mexico. In Tlacotalpan an event annually takes place known as Embalse de Toro. Seven or more bulls and/or cows get liquor administered and are forced to swim in a deep river, tied to boats. Once on land, they are hunted down and assaulted with knives and other weapons until death follows.

On the Yucatan Peninsula an event takes place called Toro Saca Tripas or Mata Caballos (officially Toros Caballistas). An 'aggressive' bull is chased by men on horses. The horses are often attacked by the bull and get seriously injured because they are not physically protected, resulting in the death of many horses.

Together with local organizations we set up campaigns in several Mexican places like Mexico City and San Luis Potosí to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types© MANT of events.

Help the bulls and horses in Mexico! Become a sponsor or make a donation!

Feast with bulls in Tlaxcala © MANT



Peru

Bullfighting in Peru began with the arrival of the first Spaniards and became an official ‘spectacle’ in Lima in 1558. Nowadays, various forms of bullfighting in Peru exist despite the fact that the majority of the Peruvian population is against bullfighting.

There are also patronal festivals with bulls in Peru. In the department of Arequipa for example the ‘Pelea de Toros’ (literally translated as bullfight) is organized. In this case bulls have to fight other bulls, not people. These bulls are not of the same breed as the bulls used by the bullfighting industry. Another popular festival with bulls in Peru is the Yawar fiesta (or "fiesta of blood"). This fiesta was organized in many villages in the higher parts of the Andes, nowadays less frequently since the condor is an endangered species. A living condor is tied on the back of a bull during the festival, symbolizing the struggle between the Incas and the Spanish conquistadores.
Peru Antiaurino protest

Together with loca
l organizations we set up campaigns, as is the case in Lima and Huancayo, to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.

Help the bulls and horses in Peru! Become a sponsor or make a donation!

Protest in Peru © Peru Anitaurino





Portugal

Portugal has its own style of bullfights (touradas or corridas de touros). The main difference with other types of bullfights is that the major matador ‘fights’ the bull from a horse. The bull is not slain in the arena, under the watchful eye of the public, often hours or days after the bullfight. Per bullfight six bulls are killed.

In Portugal, every year more than 4,000 bulls are slain during bullfights and other events with bulls. Also on the Azores - an autonomous group of islands belonging to Portugal – bullfights are organized, as it is the case in Terceira and Graciosa. Both islands have their own bullring.

The majority of the Portuguese is against bullfighting, a tradition which is becoming less popular in Portugal.

Together with local organizations we set up campaigns in several Portuguese places to inform people © ANIMALabout the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.

Help the bulls and horses in Portugal. Become a sponsor or make a donation!


Portuguese bullfight © ANIMAL



Spain

In Spain several forms of bullfights take place. An average of 30,000 bulls in total are annually abused and slain during events with bulls.

According to various surveys and polls, the majority of Spaniards is opposed to bullfighting and against the use of public funds to finance this sector. The bullfighting industry receives regional and national grants and from agricultural subsidies from the European Union.

Bullfighting is becoming less popular in Spain. Without subsidies, the industry would not be able to survive. Other sources of income do not provide enough coverage to maintain the bullfighting sector.

Furthermore many Spanish municipalities celebrate patronal festivals where bulls are tortured. Frequently the public itself is responsible for the maltreatment of the animals. CAS also fights against this form of entertainment with bulls.

Together with local organizations we set up campaigns in several Spanish cities and towns to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events. We also have projects to counter the patronal festivals with bulls in, for example, Pamplona and Tordesillas. © CAS International

Help the bulls and horses in Spain! Become a sponsor or make a donation.

 © CAS International



Venezuela

Bullfighting was introduced in Venezuela with the arrival of the Spaniards. Today, Venezuela has various forms of bullfighting. In Venezuela, the majority of the population is against bullfighting.

The bullring Nuevo Circo in Caracas has been closed for years because of the absence of an audience for bullfighting. Now the arena has been rebuilt and used for cultural events without animals instead.

Some municipalities have banned bullfighting, as it is the case in Naguanagua. In San Antonio Merida access of minors to the arena is prohibited.

Festivities with bulls continue in Venezuela, though. Coleos or Toros Coleados are very popular, especially in rural areas. This is a national sport in which two riders repeatedly try to work a bull to the ground by pulling is tail.

Together with local organizations we set up campaigns to inform people about the atrocities of bullfighting and to persuade politicians to prohibit these types of events.© CAS International

Help the bulls and horses in Venezuela! Become a sponsor of make a donation!

In the bullring of Caracas, Nuevo Circo, no more bullfights take place © CAS International